Alienation and isolation near Washington Square

In 1925, Edward Hopper likely went up to the roof of his studio
at 3 Washington Square North to complete this painting of the top
two stories of an old building.

He ultimately titled it “Skyline, Near Washington
Square.”


“The brownstone’s facade is encrusted with Victorian
cornices, brackets, arched and square window moulds picked out with
heavy shadows,”
wrote Gerry Souter
in his book, Edward Hopper. “The sides are
whitewashed brick seared with sunlight.”

The building is like a dowager of another era, pretty in its day
but now isolated, alienated, and stripped of its humanity in the
modern urban cityscape.

Or maybe the building is Edward Hopper? Apparently this painting
with its “gangly skyscraper” was originally titled
“Self-Portrait,”
according to Gail Levin’s
Edward Hopper: An Intimate
Biography.

Source: FS – 898253
Alienation and isolation near Washington Square